Finely Carved Wood Figure the Nepalese Goddess Cunda Devi 18th Century

This finely carved figure of the four-armed Nepalese Goddess possibly a form of Cunda Devi who is a form of Vairocana. Dating form the 18th Century.  She is here in her wrathful form dancing on a corpse representing selfish ignorance and she holds a strangely non-Buddhist array of items. In her top hands, she holds an elephant goad and a circlet (a symbol of Vishnu) and her lower hands hold a lotus and an unidentifiable item. She has a necklace of skulls and is surrounded by cosmic flames showing that she exists beyond the end of time, symbolised here by the flames

It is obviously a part of a larger architectural carving.

On the back, there is an old label that reads ” The University of Texas Exhibition Program”

The Todd Barlin Collection of Asian Buddhist Art

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

Fine Clay Votive Temple Tile depicting the Deity Ganesh West Bengal India 13th-16th Century

This beautiful old clay votive architectural tile was from Rajshahi District Bengal Province in India, it was purchased in the 1960s in Bangladesh. Depicting the deity Ganesh in Paharpur Style.

Ganesh is shown seated, his more usual position, he holds the elephant goad and the chowrie fan in his 2 raised hands and one lower hand offers a blessing and the other an unidentifiable item, possibly a radish to which he is very partial

In India’s, West Bengal they made a speciality of terracotta temples, with the sculpted decoration from the same material as the main brick construction.

Terracotta tiles have a long history in many parts of the world. Many ancient and traditional architectural styles included more elaborate sculptural elements than the plain roof tiles, such as Chinese Imperial roof decoration and the antefix of western classical architecture.

The soft colour on this artwork adds a lot to its presence.  It’s in good condition except for a couple of very small chips as clearly seen in the photo just under the left knee and it does not disturb the balance of the artwork.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Asian Art

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

 

Clay Votive Temple Tile depicting the Deity Manasa West Bengal India 13th-16th Century

This beautiful old clay votive architectural tile was from West Bengal Province in India, it was purchased in the 1960s in Bangladesh. Depicting the deity Manasa, Goddess of Snakes. Dating from the 13 th-16th Century.  Manasa protects from snakebites and all other poisons as well as bring about success in all worldly affairs.  She is one of the most popular deities in Bengal. She is shown with a canopy of seven cobras protecting her and making the gesture of fearlessness.

In India’s, West Bengal they made a speciality of terracotta temples, with the sculpted decoration from the same material as the main brick construction.

Terracotta tiles have a long history in many parts of the world. Many ancient and traditional architectural styles included more elaborate sculptural elements than the plain roof tiles, such as Chinese Imperial roof decoration and the antefix of western classical architecture.

The soft colour on this artwork adds a lot to its presence.  It’s in good condition except for a couple of very small chips as clearly seen in the photo just under the left knee and it does not disturb the balance of the artwork.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Asian Art

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

Clay Votive Temple Tile Bengal Province India 6th-10th Century

This beautiful old clay votive architectural tile was from Bengal Province in India, it was purchased in the 1960s in Bangladesh. Depicting a vibrant dancing figure wearing a headdress and is holding an object in each hand.  The dance pose is quite typical of those in Bharata Nrtyam, India’s classical dance.

In India West Bengal made a speciality of terracotta temples, with the sculpted decoration from the same material as the main brick construction.

Terracotta tiles have a long history in many parts of the world. Many ancient and traditional architectural styles included more elaborate sculptural elements than the plain roof tiles, such as Chinese Imperial roof decoration and the antefix of western classical architecture.

The soft colour on this artwork adds a lot to its presence.  Its in good condition except for a small chip on the right side of the headdress the figure is wearing as clearly seen in the photo.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Asian Art

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

A Superb 18th Century Mongolian Buddhist Thangka Painting Depicting Yamataka

This Superb Mongolian Thangka Painting of Yamantaka with consort. This magnificent scroll painting is of the very highest level of workmanship and would have been intended as an offering to a monastery or for use in a wealthy patron’s home. The name Yamantaka means ‘He Who Puts an End to Death’ and his alternative name, Vajrabhairava, means ‘Indestructible Wrathful One’. Both names give the viewer the impression that they are in the presence of a most powerful deity whose ability to conquer death and its terrors make it a liberating deity, one not to be feared but to be actively used in the process toward Enlightenment.
Yamantaka is the special deity of the Gelugpa tradition, which became the most powerful and influential in Mongolia. His hands clasp a variety of symbolic ritual instruments, including a Dharma wheel, swords, arrows, lances and corpses of malignant deities. His consort, Vajravetali can be seen offering him a skull cup of wisdom, with her right hand held high in a threatening gesture. Below the pair are (from the viewer’s left): a protector deity riding on a bear, a small white six-armed form of Mahakala, a small Palden Lhamo, and another protector deity riding a horse.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Tibetan and Mongolian Buddhist Art & Asian Art

Exhibited and Published:  The Art of Compassion: Buddhist Art from The Todd Barlin Collection. Sydney Australia 2018. Catalogue written By David Templeman, Pages 21-22

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

Superb Mongolian Cloth Applique Thangka Depicting Dancing Citipati

This finely sewn Mongolian Buddhist Cloth Applique Thangka depicting dancing Citipati Deities.  20th Century

” The skeleton figures, representing worldly spirits, in Tibetan Cham dances are often seen as jesters or servants for other minor worldly gods such as Yama. These Cham dancing skeletons, like the other characters found in dance such as the deer and yak headed servants of Yama, are generally only found in narrative vignettes if found at all in Tibetan paintings. The most common dance represented in painting is generally known descriptively as the Black Hat Dance and specifically understood to be the Vajrakilaya Cham dance. There will, of course, be images or random skeletons found in wrathful deity paintings or in the many depictions of the charnel grounds where the relevant Sanskrit and Tibetan texts explicitly state that skeletons are found in cemeteries”  Jeff Watt 4-2004  Himalayan Resources

Thangka appliqué is a technique of creating thangkas using not paint, but cloth and precious silk. Just like thangka paintings, thangka applique is a sacred art, and appliqués follow the iconography for Buddhist deities as laid down Buddhist scripture. The art of appliqué first began among the Huns of Central Asia to embroider saddle blankets. Gradually, it spread east across the Silk Road and was adopted by Tibetans and Mongolians as religious art.

The Todd Barlin Collection of Buddhist Art and Asian Arts

Exhibited:  The Art of Compassion: Buddhist Art from the Todd Barlin Collection 2018

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

 

Four Rare 18th Century Mongolian Buddhist Paintings of scenes depicting Hell

These four finely painted gruesome panels of Mongolian Buddhist Paintings of depictions of  Hell. Dating from the 18th Century.

The Tibetan scholar David Templeman describes these paintings ”

These rather gruesome paintings are usually claimed to depict the sufferings sentient beings might undergo in the hell realms as a result of their karmic actions on earth. However, these are not the classical hell torments depicted in the Wheel of Life illustrations, where there are sufferings based upon heat, cold, inability to eat and so on.

These seem to be a particularly Mongolian depiction of a special range of tortures (particularly the lower sheet, extreme right), which are unheard of in Tibetan depictions. However, scenes and tortures have been noted in the lower register of certain scroll paintings of Mongolia’s pre-eminent protector, Begtse, in which his entourage of red demons engages in somewhat similar harm to enemies of the Buddhist Dharma. ”

Published & Exhibited in the exhibition  THE ART OF COMPASSION 2018 on page 103

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Tibetan & Mongolia Art

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

 

A Superb Large and Rare 12th-13th Century Bronze Phurba from Tibet

This superb large and rare bronze Phurba from Tibet. Dating from the 12th -13th Century and belonging to Tibet’s indigenous Bon religion. This finely cast heavy bronze Phurba harnesses the three-sided deity Phurba Drugse Chempa with stacks of wrathful heads above an openwork endless knot grip and a tripartite blade. The whole Phurba is bound with old red cotton strings with suspended copper skulls talismans.

The Bon was a Pre Buddhist religion in Tibet which did convert to Buddhism.  Bon was characterized as “animism” and “shamanism”;

The term “Bon” has been used to refer to several different phenomena. Drawing from Buddhist sources, early Western commentators on Bon used the term for the pre-Buddhist religious practices of Tibet. These include folk religious practices, cults surrounding royalty, and divination practices. However, scholars have debated whether the term “Bon” should be used for all of these practices, and what their relationship is to the modern Bon religion.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Buddhist Art

 

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

 

 

Superb Early Gilt Bronze Repousse Buddhist Aureole depicting Buddha Tibet 14th Century

Three Superb Early Gilt Bronze Repousse Buddhist Aureole depicting Buddha and Lamas, Tibet 14th- 15th Century

David Templeman  writes;

”  These fragments of a large aureole depicting Buddha and lamas, Tibet, 14th–15th century

Densatil was the earliest monastery in Tibet to belong to the Kagyu tradition. Built-in the 12th century, it became lavishly patronised and was able by the 14th century to erect magnificent images with sumptuous aureoles often several metres high. A high proportion of the workmanship was accomplished by Newar artisans from the Kathmandu Valley.

Far-left image is that of a Lama, probably of the Sakya tradition, with his right hand raised in the teaching gesture and wearing a typical Sakya style of hat.

The middle image depicts a lama with his right hand in a preaching gesture.

The far-right image depicts a lama in what appears to be the gesture of imparting secret teachings, the gesture of the deity of supreme knowledge, Vairocana. ”

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Buddhist Art

Published and Exhibited: “The Art of Compassion ”  2018 by David Templeman  Published page 16

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.

 

 

 

Superb Gilt Bronze Repousse Buddhist Aureole Tibet 14th- 15th Century

This superb gilt-bronze repousse Aureole from Tibet dating from the 14th – 15th century.

David Templeman  writes;

” This aureole, which is missing its focal image, still retains much of its magnificence. The image might have been a standing Padmapani, flanked by his two bodhisattva attendants. The top depicts Garuda (mythological bird), the enemy of serpents and a general protector and bringer of auspiciousness. In mythology, Garuda took hold of the subterranean serpents, who were churning the milk oceans and stole the ambrosia that resulted from their activities. In later Buddhist myth, the ambrosia was replaced by the ‘Perfection of Wisdom’ texts, which Garuda rescued and passed on to the Buddhist deities. He is seen holding a snake in his claws and is attended by two Apsara nymphs below him. Also below, in the corners of the horizontal bars, are two Makaras (water spirits), who are also auspicious. On each side of them horizontally are two vases containing long-life nectar. Below them may be seen two attendants to the main figure (missing), as well as two standing half-human, half-lion leogryphs and two elephants. The main shrine area is painted in red cinnabar.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Buddhist Art

Published and Exhibited: “The Art of Compassion ”  2018 by David Templeman  Published page 16

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us.