A Superb Old Coolamon Bowl Central Australia 19th Century

A Superb Old Coolamon Bowl Central Australia 19th Century

This very fine beautiful old Coolamon is stone carved and is nearly perfect in every manner starting with the fine shape. The overall thickness of the bowl tapers slightly to the edges, the bottom of the bowl is convex as if it was made to sit gently in one’s hands or lap, and both sides of the bowl are finely incised with the same fluted designs. The whole bowl has a deep rich old patina from decades of daily use and traces of red ochre applied many times over long periods.

Coolamons were traditionally used by Aboriginal women to carry water, fruit, and nuts, as well as to cradle babies. Coolamons were often carried on the head when traveling any distance, or under the arm if used as a cradle. If carried on the head, a ring pad was placed on the head, made out of possum and or human hair string. This helped to cushion and support the carriage of the coolamon.  The Pintupi of the Western Desert would attach a double strand of plaited rope made of hair or plant fibre to sling the coolamon over their shoulders. They also wore smaller coolamons as hats, with twine around the chin.

Coolamons were used for winnowing grains in the traditional bread-making process, as well as a general heating and cooking vessel. They could even be used as an umbrellas.

Coolamons were generally made by men. They are usually made from a hardwood such as mallee.  A piece of the outer bark of the tree is removed and then molded over the fire to give it its distinctive curved sides. Deep ridges were made using a quartz stone knife. It needed to stand for several days, with a stick of wood holding it open to prevent it from losing its shape

Coolamons were often ornately decorated on their exterior with various designs. They were also used in ceremonies, such as for aromatic smoking, which was believed to have purifying effects.

They were rubbed regularly with fat, such as emu fat to keep the wood in good condition.

Provenance: The Tood Barlin Collection of Aboriginal & New Guinea Oceanic Arts

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

 

A Fine Old Central Australia Aboriginal Shield 19th Century

A Fine Old Central Australia Aboriginal Shield 19th Century

This very fine old example of Central Australia Shield is made of Beanwood and is coarsely covered with red ochre and fat. There is continuous incised fluting on both sides with a deep-cut lug handle on the back.

The front of the shield is cut with deep grooves used for fire-making. Shields were not only a defensive weapon but also used for ceremonies painted with ochre designs, the shield was also a multipurpose tool and used for making fires. The companion tool used for this was a hardwood spear-thrower that doubled up as a saw. The saw was rubbed back and forth in the grooves producing shavings, heat, and eventually, flame. Since Aboriginal hunters and warriors carried both shields and spear-throwers with them, they were able to make fire at all times.

Provenance: Bill Newcomen Snr (1927 to 2012)

Collected at Wave Hill Station Kimberly Area West Australia by Bill Newcomen in 1953.

He was good friends with Vincent Liniari who in August 1966, Vincent Lingiari, a Gurindji spokesman, led a walk-off of 200 Aboriginal stockmen, house servants, and their families from Wave Hill as a protest against the work and pay conditions.

The Todd Barlin Collection of Oceanic Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

A Fine Old New Guinea Flute Stopper Sepik River Area Papua New Guinea 19th Century

A Fine Old New Guinea Flute Stopper from the Coastal Sepik River Area  in the East Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea 

This old and well-used Flute Stopper is from the Coastal Sepik River area of Papua New Guinea. In the form of a standing male ancestor figure holding his hands to his chest, the figure has a presence that the older New Guinea sculptures often have.  The energy and presence in New Guinea Art is what inspired many of the early 20th-century Western modern artists; painters and sculptors have been greatly inspired and influenced by the tribal arts of Oceania. Since the turn of the century when Gauguin, Picasso, Matisse, and others first acquainted themselves with masks and sculptures from these areas, modern artists have continued to display a strong interest in the art and culture of tribal societies.

The Museum of Modern Art in New York had the ground-breaking exhibition “Primitivism In 20th Century” in 1984 that showcased Oceanic & African Art along with Gauguin, Picasso, Brancusi, Modigliani, Klee, the Expressionists, and Surrealists–most deeply involved with Oceanic Art.  This is a must-own publication if you can find a copy.

For many New Guinea people, flutes are among the most sacred and important of all musical instruments. Sacred flutes were made from hollow cylinders of bamboo and played, like a Western flute, by blowing through a hole in the side of the instrument near the upper end. The tops of these flutes were almost always decorated with Flute Stoppers depicting important ancestors or totemic animals.  Some of the finest artworks made in the Sepik River area were the sacred Flute Stoppers.

These sacred flutes were used in pairs and were kept hidden in the Men’s Ceremonial House or haus tambaran.  The sound of the flutes are the voices of specific honoured ancestors or spirits and the flutes have their own personal names.

Flutes are also associated with crocodile spirits and flutes were used during initiation rites in which novices had cuts made on their backs and chests that healed into permanent scarification that resembled crocodile skin and marked them as initiated individuals.

Provenance: The John Friede Collection ( Joika Coll) New York.  The Todd Balin Collection of New Guinea Oceanic Art 

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

A Superb Maori Smoking Pipe Attributed to the Maori Master Carver Patoromu Tamatea Circa 1850 died 1890

A Superb Maori Smoking Pipe Attributed to the Maori Master Carver Patoromu Tamatea Circa 1850 to 1890

This beautifully carved Maori Smoking Pipe is a great sculpture, carved in the form of an ancestor figure which is similar the the Maori ” acrobat figures ” sometimes found on the finials of 19th Paddles where the figures are depicted in impossible human positions;  this pipe has the shoulders and arms evolving out of the head with the hands on the mouth, the legs positioned below but there is no torso or body.  It is a playful carving but also a constant reminder of the ancestors made visible on daily use objects.

Patoromu Tamatea Of Ngati Tamateatutahi, a sub tribe of Ngati Pikiao. He was a distinguished carver and built several canoes at Kopuatepa at Rotoiti. He worked at cultivations at Onepoto, Manututu, and Ngakokako, where he and others built a canoe called Te Ahikaka. Work ceased at Ngakokako in 1864 when the Tairawhiti army arrived and most of the people returned to Rotoiti.

Patoromu was involved in settling a dispute over pigs at Wairere at Tokerau on the north shore of Lake Rotoiti.

Many of Patoromu Tamatea carved figures, weapons, lidded bowls, boxes, walking sticks, and tobacco pipes are now in Auckland Museum and the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa. (Information from Roger Neich, Auckland Institute and Museum)

This is one of my favorite artworks.

Provenance: Old Collection Australia. The Todd Barlin Collection of Maori & Polynesian Art 

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

 

A Superb Old New Guinea Huon Gulf Betel Nut Mortar19th Century Papua New Guinea

A Superb Old New Guinea Betel Nut Mortar from Tami or Siassi Islands Huon Gulf  Area Morobe Province  Papua New Guinea Dating from the 19th Century 

This very beautiful old Betel Nut Mortar is finely carved in the form of a kneeling male Ancestor Figure there is also fine incised clan designs on his face and back and a deep reddish brown encrusted patina from long use & handling.

Some betel nut mortars, carried by male elders, served as marks of secular and religious authority, they were often adorned with images of spirits, ancestors, or other supernatural beings, and some also had magical properties.

Betel Mortars were used by old men & women whose teeth were no longer strong enough to chew the betel nuts so they were cut up & put in this type of mortar and crushed into a paste so its easy to ingest when you don’t have teeth. When chewing, the individual periodically places the nut and a small quantity of lime in the mortar and crushes it with a pestle to release the active ingredients before placing it back in the mouth.

Betel Nut is the fruit of the areca palm (Areca catechu), which grows in much of the tropical Pacific (Melanesia and Micronesia), South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Chewing Betel nut is a mild stimulant such as coffee & people use it throughout their lifetime.

People in the Huon Gulf area & much of New Guinea chew betel daily. Betel is chewed with lime made from burnt and crushed seashells and mustard leaves (Piper sp) they are mixed in the mortar and then into the mouth and that produces a mild stimulant.

The utensils made for chewing betel nut are some of the most beautiful smaller-scale sculptures made in New Guinea. Like this old example, they were often owned and used by elderly people who still enjoy the Betel Nut but no longer have teeth to chew it.  They can be family heirlooms passed down generations.

Chewing betel is a special occasion ritual that occurs at weddings, funerals, births and settlements of disputes; it is present in less formal situations such as a welcoming offer to guests; and daily as it is habit forming. Beautifully decorated mortars used to crush the nut are found throughout New Guinea. Some are traded widely and some are presented as bride price.

Provenance: Dr Edwin Archibald Holland (1927- 1938 in New Guinea) & The Todd Barlin Collection of New Guinea Oceanic Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

 

Two Fine Old Vanuatu Ceremonial Heads or Temmes Nevimbur Malekula Island Vanuatu

Two Fine Old Vanuatu Ceremonial Heads or Temmes Nevimbur Malekula Island Vanuatu

These beautiful Ceremonial Heads called Temmes Nevimbur were collected on Malekula Island in 1987.

In SW Malekula Island these Puppet Heads are known as “Temes Nevimbur” They are used during important ceremonies by members of a secret society, such as “Nevimbur”.  The Puppet Heads are seen from behind the community dancing ground fence (a sacred area).   Many of these ceremonies celebrate the attainment of higher status within the secret societies known as “grade taking ” or taking of a higher title.  Merit rather than birth determines the grade or rank of an individual within these societies. A man with strong determination can be elevated over a lifetime to the status of a living deity. Pigs are crucial to obtaining the higher status for the highest levels of the secret society, dozens of full circle tusked pigs are needed to be sacrificially killed on a single occasion to take the next level or grade within the society.

Both are on a custom-made stands for easy display.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Oceanic and Vanuatu Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

 

A Fine Old Fijian Turtle Form Kava Bowl Lau Islands Fiji Polynesia

A Fine Old Fijian Turtle Form Kava Bowl Lau Islands Fiji Polynesia

This elegant Turtle form Kava Bowl is known as darivonu, which was used for the consumption of kava, or yaqona. Carved from a single piece of hardwood the head looks just like a green Sea Turtle with the front & back flippers of the turtle made up of the rim of the bowl, the bowl is supported by four rounded legs.

This bowl was used for the mixing of Kava Root the psychoactive beverage made from the stems and roots of the pepper bush Piper Methysticum and mixed with water.

In the past, most Polynesian societies were governed by hereditary chiefs, and chiefs remain highly influential in many Polynesian cultures today. Often, they are believed to be more directly descended from the gods than commoners, who constitute the majority of the population. Chiefs hold, or held, both sacred and secular authority. Many of Polynesia’s most refined decorative art forms were dedicated to marking the status and enriching the lives of chiefs. These include a diversity of jewellery, garments, weapons, and personal accessories. In many areas, necklaces or chest ornaments made from ivory or other precious materials served as insignia of chiefly rank. Almost all of the important objects had individual names and histories. Passed down as heirlooms, many were, and still are, regarded as living entities, infused with the supernatural power (mana) of the generations of ancestors who have owned them.

\Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of Polynesian Oceanic Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

 

A Superb Old New Guinea Neckrest Abelam People East Sepik Province Papua New Guinea

A Superb Old New Guinea Neckrest from the Abelam People East Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea

This superb old Neckrest is finely carved in the form of back-to-back male & female Ancestor Spirit Figures. The neck support becomes the body of a totemic wild Boar whose head you see at the top left, the Boars legs transform into the Ancestor figure’s arms that show not only the great imagination of the artist but also the connection between the Ancestor Figure & the wild boar a  fierce powerful totemic animal that is admired for its strength.   Abelam Neckrests are rare, I have only seen a few in my 40 years of collecting

This old Neckrest base is not flat at all as people slept on uneven sometimes dirt or sand floors covered by a woven mat. This Neckrest would not stand up without the stand, it’s a sign of its age and the whole piece has a dark brown patina from long use & handling. It was owned by more than one generation and kept as a family heirloom.

Some Neckrests, used by elders, served as marks of secular and religious authority, they are often adorned with images of spirits, ancestors, or other supernatural beings, and some also had magical properties.

Sepik spirituality was highly individualized, with each kinship group within a village taking an emblematic name, or totem, from the birds and animals of the Sepik River region, a totem serves as the group’s symbol and signifies their ancestral heritage — though they all recognized a common ancestry with the crocodile. Elders who have memorized the copious totemic emblems hold great prestige and power within the village. Representations of the animal totems such as the Boar on this headrest are important in honoring and nurturing relationships with the ancestors.

The headrest is imbued with an especially significant spirituality because of its association with the mystical aura of sleep. Sleep was recognized as the most intimate relationship with the spirit realm, therefore the decoration on headrests was especially intertwined with their spiritual beliefs. Furthermore, the human head is associated with concepts of power, therefore anything that was created to support this power was subsequently revered.

Headrests like this one are prominent across diverse cultures and eras. From the dark vaults of Ancient Egyptian tombs to the banks of the Sepik River, headrests were utilized to support sleepers lying on their sides and preserve intricate hairstyles during the night. Many people from ancient civilizations slept on mats, therefore headrests were emblematic status symbols and were generally reserved for prominent figures in such cultures. Though they might look uncomfortable in comparison with our Western accommodations, their structure actually supports proper spine alignment.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of New Guinea Oceanic Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

 

A Fine Old New Guinea Dance Staff Lake Sentani Area NW Coast West Papua Irian Jaya

A Fine Old New Guinea Dance Staff Lake Sentani Area NW Coast West Papua Irian Jaya

This beautiful old Lake Sentani Net Dance Staff was one of the first artworks that I collected on Lake Sentani 38 years ago when I spent months in the area. The second photo above is of the Ondafi or Chief’s son holding the Dance Staff in 1985

This beautifully carved Dance Staff with the finial carved in the form of a chiefly Ancestor who is holding a drum in his hands & has a tobacco pipe in his mouth. This is likely an actual portrait of the Chief or Ondafi of Bobrongko Village on Lake Sentani where I collected it in 1985 the carver was deceased as was the chief it portrayed.

Below the figure are three wide bands of finely incised scrolling designs called fou which is a chiefly design used solely on artworks made for the chiefly families or Ondafi.

Dance Staff were used during important ceremonies where the chief carried the staff as a sign of his authority in the village & surrounding area. It was also used during chiefly oration where the staff was used to emphasize his words.

Provenance: The Todd Barlin Collection of New Guinea Oceanic Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us 

A Superb Old New Guinea Club Angu People Merawaka Area Eastern Highlands Papua New Guinea

A Superb Old New Guinea Club  Angu People from the Merawaka Area Eastern Highlands Papua New Guinea Dating from the late 19th Century 

This rare & beautiful old Club is from the Angu People who are also known as the Kukukuku who live in the remote Eastern Highlands Provenance of Papua New Guinea.  The Angu like many mountain people are of small stature but they had a reputation as some of the fiercest warriors in all of New Guinea.  They wore long bark cloth cloaks that often their clubs were hidden underneath

This elegant form of Club looks like a bird in profile, it is a beautiful sculpture when standing up in the custom stand.  The club was used for close warfare to get around the side of the opponent’s shield.  There are traces of ochre decorations on the head of the club & the whole club has a dark warm patina from long use over generations.  Clubs & Shields were family heirlooms and each carried the history of the battles fought with the club & the family members that used them.  I had the chance to stay with Angu People in this area on several trips to the Eastern Highlands Province from 1985-1986.  I took the two photos of the Anga Warrior with his Shield & Club in Goroka in 1986.  I have two superb old Anga Shields also listed on my website  

Provenance: Old Collection Australia and The Todd Barlin Collection of New Guinea Oceanic Art

See my new EXHIBITIONS GALLERY  showing the Museums and Art Galleries Exhibitions that I provided artworks for over the past 40 years. There is the link to the article about my artworks published in the prestigious Louvre Magazine in 1996

I have artwork for Museums and art Galleries but also for collectors at every stage of their collecting. I want to encourage people to explore the fine art of New Guinea & West Papua and the Pacific Islands and to be able to see and touch the artworks in a relaxed and friendly manner in my Sydney Gallery. I would like to invite you to visit my gallery and see the artworks in person and also look at my website www.oceanicartsaustralia.com where there are many Galleries & Sub Galleries to explore.

My Gallery of nearly 40 years is the last physical gallery in Sydney that specializes in New Guinea and Oceanic Art.  Sydney is very close to New Guinea & the Pacific Islands where all of these amazing artworks came from, Australia’s closest neighbors.

INQUIRE HERE

If you have a similar “object” for sale please contact me for the best price and honest advice by a Government approved valuer 

To see many more rare items and the finest masterpieces, please make an appointment with us to visit the gallery.

For all inquiries, please contact us